Overcome regulatory barriers and export with ease

November 17, 2016 - Tags: Market research Planning Export

This guest blog post is provided by the Business Women in International Trade (BWIT), a program within the Trade Commissioner Service (TCS) at Global Affairs Canada, which supports Canadian women entrepreneurs as they pursue opportunities in international markets.

Whether you are new to exporting or are seeking to expand your international reach, exporting at any stage can be daunting. You may ask yourself: is it worth the risk to expand? In short, the answer is YES. According to Statistics Canada, on average, businesses that export are stronger than those that do not. The BWIT program has designed this blog post to increase your understanding of the range of regulations associated with exporting as well as direct you to key contacts which will ultimately help you reduce the risks of growing your business abroad.

Exporter rules, regulations and laws:

Understanding the rules and regulations of Canada and your target market is vital; businesses engaging in international trade need to be mindful of the rules that apply from start to finish. Although laws apply in Canada — depending on the good(s) or service(s) — including inspection certificates, export control permits, mandatory reporting of exports and export record-keeping minimums, it is also important to note that there will be local laws in your target market that will also apply to you. Standards in markets outside of Canada can include: discolours on products, language requirements on packaging, ensuring licensing is up-to-date for professional services and obtaining obligatory visas for moving individuals in and out of your target country.

Top tips for exporters:

  • Do your homework and ask the right questions to determine whether the goods or services you intend to export are subject to permits, licensing or contracting restrictions or regulations overseen by the CBSA or other Canadian government departments (OGDs). The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) is responsible for administering export requirements on behalf of OGDs. It should be noted that more than one government department may have a role to play in the requirements and regulations pertaining to the export of certain goods. For information, visit CBSA's Other Government Department and Agencies: Reference List for Exporters.
  • Determine whether or not the goods need to be declared on a Canadian Export Declaration. Depending on the destination of your shipment, you could need a certificate of origin and must be mindful that certain goods are not required to be reported on an export declaration.
  • Consult key government websites in your target market. Just as it is here in Canada, your receiving market's regulatory environment will be established by government ministries or agencies. By visiting their websites you will gain insight into the local laws that must be followed as well as the established norms for that particular market — such as methods of payment and availability of insurance. While these aspects can be handled by a Canadian broker or shipping agent, familiarizing yourself with their regulations, product standards and licensing requirements is important and will help you avoid risk — and get paid.

Leveraging BWIT and the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service (TCS)

The TCS is an extensive network of trade commissioners operating in 161 offices throughout Canada and around the globe. This network provides foreign market intelligence, introductions in key networks, cost and risk reduction advice, business problem troubleshooting and valuable on-the-ground support. As a program of TCS, BWIT has access to this network so we can provide Canadian women-owned businesses with invaluable assistance when exporting into new markets. Contact us to connect at: bwit@international.gc.ca.

Step-by-step guides and detailed tips about exporting:


Comments

Posted by Canada.ca on March 7, 2017
Thank you for contacting Canada Business. We are always happy to help you with questions about starting or growing your small business in Canada.

If you are new to doing business internationally, our export and investing abroad sections can help you learn some of the basics to help get you started.

In addition, you may wish to read the Step-by-Step Guide to Exporting, prepared by the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service (TCS).

Once you are ready to export, the TCS and the Ontario Export Services can help you navigate the complexities of international markets.

For assistance with your business questions, please contact us or call toll-free from Canada 1-888-576-4444 (ATS 1 800 457-8466).

Thank you.
Posted by Kate on March 7, 2017
Dear Sir/Madam,

We are a Toronto based skincare company looking to export products to UAE and India. What would be the requirements to do so. Kindly advise on the procedure.

Posted by Canada.ca on December 6, 2016
Hello Nathalie,

Thank you for contacting Canada Business. We are a government organization that helps entrepreneurs start or grow their business in Canada.

In order to better market your product in Canada, TFO Canada can help you access the Canadian market by providing free online information on how to export to Canada, or, if you're already exporting to Canada, how to promote your offers to Canadian importers. You might also consider looking for a Canadian business to partner with to help you sell your product. If so, consult the Canadian Company Capabilities (CCC) database. This database can help you find and connect with companies across Canada, by industry and even by product. If your business is roses, you could try searching on "flowers" or "horticulture", for example.

You also may want to try the Canadian Importers Database, which provides lists of companies importing goods into Canada by product, by city and by country of origin. You can use this database to research Canadian companies that might be in the market for your goods or services.

If you are not a resident of Canada, but are thinking of expanding your business operations to Canada, our page Immigrating to or investing in Canada to start a business provides information on what you need to do to start a business here. Find out what different regions of Canada have to offer you.

Should you have further questions about starting a business in Canada, please contact us. Thank you, and good luck in your endeavours!
Posted by Nathalie on December 5, 2016
I would like information on how to create a roses merchant, what are the requirements if you send a person from ECUADOR.

Non interested in being able to personally sell our product to have a better attention

tanks
Posted by Canada.ca on November 28, 2016
Hello Praduman,

Thank you for contacting Canada Business. We are always happy to help you with questions about starting or growing your business in Canada.

To help you plan for a successful start to your venture, check out our "Starting a business" page for some of the things you'll need to take care of first. Our "Business start-up checklist" page can help you with the basics like planning, organizing, registering, and hiring.

It's a good idea to have a plan in place for all aspects of your business. For information on preparing your business plan, you can visit our "Business planning" page for sample templates, FAQs, and more. Most potential investors and creditors will require a solid business plan so they can understand the thinking behind your numbers. Our program search will help you find government programs and financing to help you start and grow your business.

Our "Market research and statistics" page offers information that can help you with conducting market research, and help you make informed decisions to maximize the potential of your business. On our "Site selection" page, you will find tools and resources that can help you determine the best location in Canada to establish your office or set up operations.

Once you have established your business, you can find information on exporting and exploring new markets on our "Exporting" page. The Canadian Trade Commissioner Service's webpage, "Exporting to the United States - A Guide for Canadian Businesses" may also be of interest to you.

If you are not a resident of Canada, but are thinking of expanding your business operations to Canada, our page "Immigrating to or investing in Canada to start a business" provides information on what you need to do to start a business here. Find out what different regions of Canada have to offer you.

If you have further questions about taking your idea to the next step, or starting or growing your business in Canada, please contact us. Thank you.
Posted by Praduman on November 23, 2016
Dear Sir/Madam

We want to set up a Small Assembling & Manufacturing set up to produce Home Furniture & Lighting set up in CANAD for IKEA Specificly for Ameriacn & Candian market

Kindly advise how to move & whom to contact
Posted by Canada.ca on November 22, 2016
Hello Rajesh,

Thank you for contacting Canada Business. We are a government organization that helps entrepreneurs start or grow their business in Canada.

If you are searching for Canadian businesses to trade with, you may want to consult the Canadian Company Capabilities (CCC) database, where you can find and connect with companies across Canada. CCC includes hundreds of specialized manufacturing, service, and product-specific business directories that you can search to find potential business partners.

You also may want to try the Canadian Importers Database, which provides lists of companies importing goods into Canada by product, by city and by country of origin. You can use this database to research Canadian companies that might be in the market for your goods or services.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency regulates the imports of food products, and these regulations are enforced by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) at Canadian entry points.

Should you have questions about starting a business in Canada, please contact us.
Posted by Canada.ca on November 22, 2016
Hello Andrew,

Thank you for contacting Canada Business. We are always happy to help you with questions about starting or growing your small business in Canada.

While it is not possible to eliminate all uncertainty from doing business, particularly when exporting, there are steps you can take to mitigate the risks involved.

An important strategy is to involve the Canadian Trade Commissioner Service (TCS). Get to know the local trade commissioners who can provide information on risks in your sector and how to avoid them. The TCS may also introduce you to mentors for your company and help you build a network of like-minded contacts who are committed to doing business cleanly. This can include people in governments, NGOs, accounting firms, legal experts and chambers of commerce or industry associations. You should know what red flags to look for. If you get in a tight spot, the TCS can help you get out of it. Seeking assistance in the early stages of exporting is key to avoiding risk.

Something to be mindful of, specific to corruption and compliance, is that the TCS plays an important role in raising awareness of the Corruption of Foreign Public Officials Act (CFPOA). Additionally, for services where the TCS puts the Government of Canada's reputation on the line to advocate for a Canadian company, they require a signed Declaration Regarding Corruption. This attests that the Canadian company, has not been charged, convicted or sanctioned for bribery or corruption, and will not engage in such illegal activities. If the Canadian company has had issues with bribery or corruption, it must disclose these in the Declaration. The department then assesses the information and determines the level of service it can provide. With this, Canadian companies can now use both the CFPOA and the Declaration to communicate to their advantage as to why they cannot pay bribes. It remains critical for companies and their employees to be as prepared as possible to resist corruption and bribery. Even the smallest company should consider implementing a company-wide anti-bribery compliance program.

We encourage you to also visit Export Development Canada's webpage devoted to managing the risks of international trade. This includes information on risk management products that can help protect you when doing business internationally, to make sure you get paid, and to protect you from financial and political risks.

Finally, please feel free to explore other types of insurance coverage for your business on our Insurance page.

If you have further questions about starting or growing your business in Canada, please contact us.
Posted by Rajesh on November 22, 2016
very nice website, actually i am live in india. my product is sesame laddu (seeet round ), Ragi laddu ( sweet round), that is benifisicial for cold countries like protin & calcium. please more guidence me
Posted by Andrew on November 18, 2016
Exporting to Africa and South Africa. How do you determine country risk, corruption and compliance of the customer or supplier.
Should you be selling a license into these countries how do you regulate it, and make sure you get paid.

The work you are doing is very positive

Thanks

Andrew
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